When you decide to buy a laser engraving machine from leading companies such as Needham Coding you normally look at the primary function of the machine and how it will perform. There are other important areas that need to be given consideration, such as the safety of the equipment. This includes operating the machine safely to ensure the wellbeing of operators. The successful operation will have a direct impact on your business. That is why it is important to be aware of the safety procedures in order to protect from bodily harm when using laser engraving systems.

Basic safety training should be given to machine operators to ensure they are aware of the hazards associated with the system.

By following the guidelines and implementing safety procedures, hazards that are associated with laser machines should be minimized.

These hazards include:

  • Light hazards
  • Skin hazards
  • Eye hazards

Light hazards

Machine operators should not come into direct contact with the laser beam.

There are two types of light hazards:

  • Diffuse reflections
  • Specular reflections

Diffuse reflections occur when an irregular reflective surface creates a scattering light in all directions.

It is viewed as the safest reflection because it is weaker as energy is being divided in many different directions.

Specular reflections mirror recreating almost 100% of the original light. There is more danger with this form of reflection.

Skin and eye hazards

If correct laser engraving safety procedures are laser effects on the skin are usually considered a minor importance. There are some harmful results of the skin coming into contact with a laser. This includes blistering and burns. With more serious conditions resulting in Ulceration and scaring. There is a higher risk of exposure from lasers due to the skins greater surface area compared to the eye. Damage to the skin, however, is considered to be less serious.

Eye safety

Everyone is aware of the importance of protecting your eyes when operating laser systems as Eyes can be damaged if they come into contact with laser beams, this can occur even from low levels of laser light. There are some forms of laser beams which operate at a wavelength that can damage the eye. The various components of the eye, such as the cornea, lens, and retina are susceptible to damage by laser light. The severity of damage to the eye depends on the wavelength of laser light.

This can also cause a headache, and result in something called floaters. Floaters are dead cells that have detached from the retina and choroid. If the cornea has been damaged there will be an uncomfortable sensation of grittiness, as if sand were in the eye.

How to protect the eye

In order to maintain a safe work environment the use of safety glasses or protective eyewear is necessary for all individuals who are exposed to Class 3B and Class 4 laser radiation. It is important to inspect the eyewear every 6 months to ensure there is no damage such as cracks, scratches, holes, or discoloration.

A class 4 environment classifies laser machines that are hazardous because they emit high energy laser beams. Therefore it is capable of causing damage if your skin or eye is exposed to the laser the laser.

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When you decide to buy a laser engraving machine from leading companies such as Needham Coding you normally look at the primary function of the machine and how it will perform. There are other important areas that need to be given consideration, such as the safety of the equipment. This includes...