Wax is a surprisingly common ingredient in industrial inks.

The only inks that are exempt from having wax as an ingredient are those that are going to be involved in laminating, and those that are going to have a different coating of something else. Wax is a suitable additive that makes it resistant to wear and tear, including scratching, rubbing or water damage.

The wax used in industrial inks often comes in two forms – natural or synthetic. There is quite a broad range of waxes out there that can be used in ink formulas, depending on what kind of job you’re trying to achieve.

Below is a list of wax additives and the different roles they play:

  • Water Resistance: you might have guessed that this is one of the biggest reasons why wax is used in ink. Even within this category of wax, there are two sub-categories. Some wax can only be resistant to water for a temporary length of time, whereas other types of wax are entirely water resistant.
  • Abrasion Resistant: the erosion of any material is a risk you take when manufacturing a product that requires labeling. From the factory to the shelf, there are many elements that the ink can be exposed to, putting it at risk of being damaged in some way. Wax that is resistant to abrasion can prevent potential damage to the ink. It also considers elements like thickness, elasticity, toughness, strength, and hardness. Remember, the primary goal here is to prevent abrasion.
  • Texturizer: One thing you don’t want your material to be at risk of doing is slipping. This can cause accidents and potentially serious injuries. There are wax additives that are capable of making a material resistant to this kind of risk. Many coatings use this additive, but a lot of inks do as well to add an extra layer of security.
  • Slip Aid: ironically, sometimes manufacturers want the ink to make the surface slippery. Wax can assist with this as well. This is actually so the surface that the ink is on can be rubbed against other surfaces without causing any friction or damage to the ink itself. One thing to note with this type of wax is that the harder it is, the smoother the ink will be.
  • Blocking: this type of wax additive is again the opposite of the previous form. This wax works to create friction which in turn will cause two surfaces to find it impossible to rub together. This type of wax is used for surfaces that are quickly coated before being stacked together in preparation for being shipped.

All of the wax that is used in conjunction with ink falls into three categories: vegetable, mineral, and animal. Because some of it is used in the food industry, these types of wax must be food grade and approved by the FDA.

Wax is a ubiquitous ingredient in the industrial ink sector and is used in almost every ink. For a high quality ink manufacturer that provides various inks such as wide-format ink you can check out Needham Ink.

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Wax is a surprisingly common ingredient in industrial inks. The only inks that are exempt from having wax as an ingredient are those that are going to be involved in laminating, and those that are going to have a different coating of something else. Wax is a suitable additive that...